Monti: We’re actually destroying domestic demand through fiscal consolidation [trad: Noi in realtà stiamo distruggendo domanda interna attraverso il consolidamento fiscale (attraverso le tasse)]

segue testo inglese e traduzione in italiano

0:10

PAUL JAY: Welcome to The Real News Network. I’m Paul Jay in Washington.

0:12

In part one of our interview with John Weeks (and you’ll find it right below here in our

0:19

episode), we discuss Fareed Zakaria’s show of Sunday, where he talked about Germany making

0:26

reasonable demands on Greece, requiring reforms and fiscal consolidation and such. And that’s

0:33

the path to growth, Zakaria said. But it was kind of ironic. In the very next segment of

0:37

Zakaria’s show, he interviews Prime Minister Mario Monti, and Monti more or less says,

0:42

well, we’re doing everything we’re being asked and there’s no growth. Here’s a segment of

0:47

that part of the show.

0:48

FAREED ZAKARIA: When you talk about the need for a growth agenda in Europe, are you saying

0:52

that the austerity programs really haven’t worked? If you look at a country like Ireland,

0:58

which has done everything it was asked to do, or many of the things, in terms of fiscal

1:03

consolidation, cutting spending, raising taxes, it has not produced growth. It has not even

1:08

produced much investor confidence. Italy’s budget deficit is up, its debt-to-GDP ratio

1:15

is up, largely because growth has collapsed. Should these austerity measures end?

1:21

MARIO MONTI: First of all, I don’t like to speak about austerity. I prefer to speak of

1:31

fiscal discipline. Fiscal discipline, in the end, amounts to austerity if it is not accompanied

1:39

by other policies. Fiscal discipline, in my view, is there to stay. Italy has done huge

1:47

efforts towards fiscal discipline, and it is now the country in the European Union which

1:56

will achieve a structural balanced budget before all the others next year–actually,

2:04

a slight structural surplus. And yet growth is not coming.

2:10

ZAKARIA: How does that happen? So you in Italy, as you say, you have done more fiscal consolidation

2:17

than any country. You’ve done structural reforms as well. Now, how do you get that demand going?

2:23

MONTI: Exactly.

2:24

ZAKARIA: You need somebody to buy your products. Are you saying you want Germany to buy things

2:27

from you?

2:29

MONTI: Well, we are gaining a better position in terms of competitiveness because of the

2:36

structural reforms. We’re actually destroying domestic demand through fiscal consolidation.

2:41

Hence, there has to be a demand operation through Europe, a demand expansion.

2:48

As you pointed out most clearly, we, for example, in Italy are having problems because we have

2:57

achieved very good fiscal results–but will they really be sustainable in the longer term

3:05

unless the dominator, GDP, increases through growth?

3:09

JAY: Now joining us again to discuss all of this is John Weeks. John is a professor emeritus

3:15

at the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies. He’s the author of the

3:19

book Capital, Exploitation and Economic Crisis. He’s also the founder of JWeeks.org. And he

3:24

joins us again from London. Thanks, John.

3:26

JOHN WEEKS: Well, thank you for having me again.

3:30

JAY: So Zakaria and Monti now seem a bit in a quandry. They–what they both had advocated,

3:36

and certainly what the financial elite of Europe advocates, Italy says it’s doing, and

3:41

there’s no growth. What do you make of that?

3:45

WEEKS: Well, as I said in the other interview, this is all a complete misrepresentation of

3:54

what’s going on and using terms that obfuscate and mislead people. And so, for example, fiscal

4:05

consolidation, fiscal discipline, these words cover–what they mean is cuts, cutting things

4:14

that affect people’s day-to-date life. So what Monti is saying is, we’ve achieved fiscal

4:19

discipline. Sounds good, doesn’t it? It sounds like now we’re–we were undisciplined before;

4:23

now we’re disciplined. Rubbish. Italy was not undisciplined in fiscal terms. If you

4:30

look at the numbers, Italy ran an expenditure surplus throughout the 2000s, up until the

4:44

great crisis of 2008. Yes, a surplus.

4:47

Where their deficit came from was interest being paid on the national debt. And the reason

4:53

the national debt was so large was because in the 1990s, the Italian government borrowed

5:01

to maintain the lira par with the German currency in order to enter the euro. I mean, if ever

5:11

there was a case of being careful of what you want because you might get it, this is

5:15

it. So the larger debt that everybody attacks Italy about, where did it come from? It came

5:23

from borrowing to maintain the currency into the euro. Alright.

5:29

There was no need for fiscal consolidation, because actually interest rates for Italy

5:35

are much lower now than they were in the 1990s. This is a–in the case of Greece, there was

5:43

a genuine fiscal problem which could have been easily solved. But in Italy’s case, there

5:49

is no fiscal problem. You know, Berlusconi in his final days as prime minister was interviewed,

5:57

and in that interview he said, crisis? There is no fiscal crisis in Italy. Berlusconi,

6:04

a congenital liar, for once in his life told the truth. There was no fiscal problem in

6:12

Italy. This is a pure speculative phenomenon. And the Italian government, the Italian elite,

6:19

is taking advantage of it through Monti to remove those protections of workers and small

6:26

businesses in order to facilitate the development of big business in Italy, particularly in

6:34

the retail area.

6:36

JAY: And then Monti in a sense acknowledges the effect of this, because he says to Zakaria,

6:42

well, we did all this, and now we destroy domestic demand. I mean, so what do they think?

6:47

How is there going to be growth after you destroy domestic demand? So, you know, they’re

6:51

not offering solutions on either side.

6:53

WEEKS: It’s true. I want to say one more comment about–I read the text of Monti’s response.

6:59

At one point, Zakaria–doesn’t attack–says, you know, democracies don’t seem to be very

7:05

good at solving these problems; that’s why they had to put you into a government in Italy,

7:12

a nonelected government. I mean, it is remarkable if you think about it. We have two nonelected

7:21

governments in Europe, in Italy and in Greece, imposed from external pressure. I mean, that

7:30

is extraordinary, isn’t it, in the 21st century.

7:34

JAY: Yeah, it’s also kind of ironic. Zakaria’s worried about German voter taxpayers in a

7:43

democracy bailing out Greece, but he’s not very worried about any democracy in Italy

7:47

or Greece.

7:49

WEEKS: [incompr.] and so Monti says, democracies aren’t very good at doing this, because voters

7:54

have a short-term viewpoint and can’t see the long term. Democracies are not very good

7:59

at doing it, because it is a policy of the 99 percent. It is very hard to get a majority

8:06

of people to come out in favor of the policies that help the 1 percent and harm the 99 percent.

8:14

So, yes, democracies don’t do very well at imposing austerity, for the most part.

8:20

So how do you get out of this? We’ve known for a long time how to got out of it: indeed,

8:29

a fiscal expansion. Now, let me say it will not be quite that simple in Europe, because

8:36

the German government has been quite successful–German governments, I should say, plural–been quite

8:43

successful in creating a cost gap between German products and the products of the other

8:50

European countries. This was primarily by methods that I discussed in a previous interview.

8:57

Okay. Somehow you have to close that gap and get back to a situation in which trade is

9:03

more balanced among those countries. So first you stimulate demand so that there is more

9:09

demand within each country.

9:12

But then you need to do something such that you have a demand stimulus in Italy and the

9:17

result of it isn’t, say, for half the demand stimulus to go on the importation of products

9:24

from Germany. And I think what needs to happen there is there need to be–for the countries

9:32

with trade deficits with Germany there need to be temporary export subsidies, just as

9:41

Germany had export subsidies. So if you combine a fiscal stimulus [incompr.] general increase

9:47

in demand and something to narrow the cost differentials, you would have recovery. But

9:54

it’s not going to happen. That is not going to happen.

9:56

JAY: But the other part of this, too, does there not also have to be something because

10:00

part of this destruction of domestic demand is, you know, the lowering of pensions, and

10:06

most importantly the lowering and undermining of wages, that if this is going to be sustainable,

10:11

there has to be some kind of policies that lead towards higher wages? Is that not part

10:15

of this?

10:16

WEEKS: A number of people, German economists too, have said we need a policy in which growth

10:24

is tied to increases in money wages. And the increases in real wages are tied to increase

10:33

in productivity. This was in fact the practice in the 1950s and the 1960s. I mean, that’s

10:40

what European governments sought to achieve through various mechanisms, pacts between–tripartite

10:48

pacts with government, labor, and business, in which you–the rising–the incomes of workers

10:57

and a majority of the population moved in step with productivity and with growth. We

11:03

need to return to something like that. I don’t see it happening, but that is the only way

11:08

there will be sustained growth at at least a moderate pace in the major economies, and,

11:17

by implication, at the global level.

11:20

JAY: Now, twice you’ve said, I don’t see that happening. So what do you see happening?

11:24

WEEKS: Well, when you interviewed me (I don’t know if you recall it) in October of last

11:32

year, I said there was going to–very likely to be another major financial crisis, and

11:42

it would probably be the coming year, that is, in 2012, and that it would be around the

11:51

euro. You didn’t have to be Nostradamus to make that prediction, let me say.

11:57

[incompr.] what will happen? People argue, well, you know, should Greece drop out? Should

12:03

Greece default? What will–you know, with the–wouldn’t it be mad to default? Things

12:11

are out of control. Greece is going to default. This is–if I can take a phrase from Gabriel

12:19

García Márquez, this is a chronicle of an exit foretold. Sometime next month, Greece

12:29

will default. There will be an election. If the left is elected, then you’ll have a controlled

12:37

default. To a certain extent it will be controlled. At least there will be an attempt to manage

12:44

it. If the leaders of the other European countries are successful in frightening Greek population

12:54

into reelecting the same clowns and thieves that got Greece into this austerity mess,

13:01

then also there will be default and exit, but it will be chaotic, because what’s happening–as

13:09

you’ve said, what’s happening in Greece is the result of the austerity. Austerity prevents

13:18

the government from having the revenue to service the debt. Without growth, there is

13:25

no conceivable outcome other than default.

13:30

JAY: And then what?

13:33

WEEKS: Well, I think that’s [incompr.] ability to predict, but I would say that it’s conceivable

13:42

Greece could default and stay in the euro. And that would involve more of the same misery,

13:50

only even worse. More likely, I think, is that they’ll default and be abandoned. I think

14:00

that in Germany and in the European Commission, leaders are already planning for Greece to

14:09

exit. I think they take the position that, you know, the Greeks have been a problem for

14:15

too long, they can’t solve the problem on Germany’s terms, so if they default, then

14:25

just push them out.

14:28

Then what happens to the euro? Many people say it will break up. I would say that depends

14:36

on what the other weak countries do, ‘cause, see, Germany is one of the strongest economies

14:41

in the world, so it’s inconceivable that you can have a collapse of a currency which is

14:47

being used by one of the strongest countries in the world and a country which is growing–not

14:52

very fast, and on the basis of beggar-thy-neighbor policies, but still it’s growing. So I don’t

14:58

think they will enter a period of very extreme financial instability. Banks will go bust,

15:05

particularly in Spain. Perhaps some of the viewers have been reading or seeing reports

15:10

about the banks in Spain. It’s almost certain that they’ll need to be bailed out again.

15:17

Then what will happen? Will the Germans say, well, Spain has become too much of a problem

15:23

too? It will be a very chaotic situation. How chaotic and how it will be resolved I

15:30

don’t know. We’ll really be in, you know, uncharted territory, if I can use a cliche.

15:36

JAY: Thanks for joining us, John.

15:38

WEEKS: Well, thank you for having me.

15:40

JAY: And thank you for joining us on The Real News Network.

***

0:10
PAUL JAY: Benvenuti alla rete notizie reali. Io sono Paul Jay a Washington.
0:12
Nella prima parte della nostra intervista con John settimane (e lo troverete proprio sotto qui nel nostro
0:19
episodio), discutiamo spettacolo di Fareed Zakaria della domenica, dove ha parlato di fare della Germania
0:26
richieste ragionevoli sulla Grecia, che richiedono riforme e risanamento dei conti pubblici e simili. E che
0:33
il percorso di crescita, Zakaria ha detto. Ma era sorta di ironico. Nel segmento successivo del
0:37
Spettacolo di zakaria, interviste lui premier Mario Monti e Monti più o meno dice:
0:42
Beh, stiamo facendo tutto che noi stiamo viene chiesto e non non c’è nessuna crescita. Qui è un segmento di
0:47
quella parte dello spettacolo.
0:48
FAREED ZAKARIA: Quando lei parla della necessità di un’agenda di crescita in Europa, stai dicendo
0:52
che i programmi di austerità non hanno funzionato davvero? Se si guarda a un paese come l’Irlanda
0:58
che ha fatto tutto ciò che le è stato chiesto di fare, o molte delle cose, in termini fiscali
01.03
consolidamento, taglio spesa, alzando le tasse, non ha prodotto crescita. Non ha nemmeno
01.08
ha prodotto molta fiducia degli investitori. È il deficit di bilancio dell’Italia, il rapporto debito-PIL
01.15
è, in gran parte perché la crescita è crollato. Queste misure di austerità dovrebbero finire?
01.21
MARIO MONTI: Prima di tutto, non mi piace parlare di austerità. Io preferisco parlare di
01.31
disciplina fiscale. Disciplina fiscale, alla fine, ammonta all’austerità, se non è accompagnata
01.39
da altre politiche. Disciplina fiscale, a mio avviso, è lì per restare. Italia ha fatto enormi
01.47
gli sforzi verso la disciplina fiscale e ora è il paese dell’Unione europea che
01.56
raggiungerà il pareggio di bilancio strutturale prima di tutti gli altri l’anno prossimo..–in realtà,
02.04
una lieve eccedenza strutturale. E ancora la crescita non è venuta.
02.10
ZAKARIA: Come che succede? Così in Italia, come tu dici, hai fatto più di consolidamento fiscale
02.17
di qualsiasi paese. Hai fatto le riforme strutturali. Ora, come si ottiene che venga “la domanda” (aumento dei consumi interni)?
02.23
MONTI: esattamente.
02.24
ZAKARIA: Hai bisogno di qualcuno a comprare i vostri prodotti. Stai dicendo che vuoi Germania per comprare le cose
02.27
da voi?
02.29
MONTI: Beh, ci stiamo guadagnando una posizione migliore in termini di competitività a causa della
02.36
riforme strutturali.

Noi in realtà stiamo distruggendo domanda interna attraverso il consolidamento fiscale.

02.41
Quindi, ci deve essere un’operazione richiesta attraverso Europa, un’espansione della domanda.
02.48
Come sottolineato più chiaramente, ad esempio, in Italia stiamo avendo problemi perché abbiamo
02.57
raggiunto ottimi risultati fiscali..–ma lo saranno davvero sostenibile a lungo termine
03.05
a meno che il dominator, il PIL, aumenta attraverso la crescita?
03.09
JAY: Ora unendo nuovamente per discutere di tutto questo è John settimane. John è un professore emerito
03.15
presso la University of London School of Oriental and African Studies. Egli è l’autore della
03.19
libro capitale, lo sfruttamento e la crisi economica. Egli è anche il fondatore di JWeeks.org. E lui
03.24
ci unisce ancora una volta da Londra. Grazie, John.
03.26
SETTIMANE del JOHN: Beh, grazie per avermi ancora una volta.
03.30
JAY: Così Zini e Monti ora sembrano un po’ in una quandry. Loro..–quello che entrambi avevano sostenuto,
03.36
e certamente ciò che sostiene l’elite finanziaria dell’Europa, Italia dice che sta facendo, e
03.41
non non c’è nessuna crescita. Di che cosa fai?
03.45
SETTIMANE: Beh, come ho detto in altra intervista, questo è tutto un completo travisamento del
03.54
ciò che è in corso e usando termini che confondere e fuorviare la gente. E così, per esempio, fiscale
04.05
consolidamento, disciplina fiscale, queste parole di copertura..–cosa significano tagli, cose di taglio
04.14
che influenzano la vita di giorno alla data del popolo. Quindi ciò che dice Monti è, abbiamo ottenuto fiscale
04.19
disciplina. Suona bene, non è vero? Sembra che ora siamo..–siamo stati indisciplinati prima;
04.23
ora ci stiamo disciplinati. Spazzatura. L’Italia non era indisciplinato in termini fiscali. Se si
04.30
guardare ai numeri, Italia correva un surplus di spesa nel corso del 2000, fino al
04.44
grande crisi del 2008. Sì, un surplus.
04.47
Da dove proviene il disavanzo era interesse pagati sul debito nazionale. E la ragione
04.53
il debito nazionale era così grande era perché nel 1990, il governo italiano ha preso in prestito
05.01
per mantenere la parità lira con la moneta tedesca al fine di inserire l’euro. Voglio dire, se mai
05.11
c’è stato un caso di essere attenti a ciò che si vuole, perché potrebbe farlo, questo è
05.15
esso. Così il debito più grande che ognuno attacca Italia circa, da dove vengono? È venuto
05.23
da prestiti per mantenere la valuta in euro. Va bene.
05.29
Non non c’era nessuna necessità di consolidamento fiscale, perché in realtà di tassi di interesse per l’Italia
05.35
sono molto inferiore di quanto fossero negli anni 90. Questo è un..–nel caso della Grecia, non c’era
05.43
un vero e proprio problema fiscale che potrebbe facilmente risolte. Ma nel caso dell’Italia, ci
05.49
non è nessun problema fiscale. Sai, Berlusconi nei suoi ultimi giorni come primo ministro è stato intervistato,
05.57
e in quell’intervista ha detto, la crisi? Non non c’è nessuna crisi fiscale in Italia. Berlusconi,
06.04
un bugiardo congenito, per una volta nella sua vita ha detto la verità. C’è stato alcun problema fiscale in
06.12
Italia. Questo è un puro fenomeno speculativo. E il governo italiano, il élite italiana,
06.19
sta approfittando di esso attraverso i Monti per rimuovere tali protezioni dei lavoratori e piccoli
06.26
imprese al fine di agevolare lo sviluppo delle grandi imprese in Italia, specialmente in
06.34
l’area retail.
06.36
JAY: E poi Monti in un certo senso riconosce l’effetto di questo, perché mi dice Zakaria,
06.42
Beh, abbiamo fatto tutto questo, e ora lo distruggiamo la domanda interna. Voglio dire, così, che cosa pensano?
06.47
Come ci sta andando essere crescita dopo che si distrugge la domanda interna? Quindi, sai, sono
06.51
non offrendo soluzioni su entrambi i lati.
06.53
SETTIMANE: È vero. Voglio dire uno più commentare su..–ho letto il testo della risposta di Monti.
06.59
A un certo punto, Zilli..–non attacca..–dice, sai, democrazie non sembrano essere molto
07.05
bravo a risolvere questi problemi; Ecco perché hanno dovuto metterti in un governo in Italia,
07.12
un governo nonelected. Insomma, è notevole se si pensa che su di esso. Abbiamo due nonelected
07.21
governi in Europa, in Italia e in Grecia, imposto dalla pressione esterna. Voglio dire, che
07.30
è straordinario, non è vero, nel XXI secolo.
07.34
JAY: Sì, è anche sorta di ironico. Zakaria preoccupato per i contribuenti tedeschi elettore in un
07.43
democrazia salvataggio Grecia, ma di lui non molto preoccupata per qualsiasi democrazia in Italia
07.47
o Grecia.
07.49
SETTIMANE: [incompr.] e così dice Monti, democrazie non sono molto bravi a fare questo, perché gli elettori
07.54
avere un punto di vista a breve termine e non può vedere a lungo termine. Democrazie non sono molto buoni
07.59
a farlo, perché è una politica del 99 per cento. È molto difficile ottenere una maggioranza
08.06
di persone a venire fuori in favore di politiche che aiutano l’1 per cento e danneggiano il 99 per cento.
08.14
Quindi, sì, democrazie non fanno molto bene a imporre austerità, per la maggior parte.
08.20
Così come si può ottenere da questo? Noi abbiamo saputo per lungo tempo ha ottenuto fuori di esso: infatti,
08.29
un’espansione fiscale. Ora, lasciatemi dire che non sarà abbastanza semplice in Europa, perché
08.36
il governo tedesco ha avuto abbastanza successo..–i governi tedeschi, dovrei dire, plurale – stato abbastanza
08.43
riuscito a creare un gap di costo tra prodotti tedeschi e i prodotti di altro
08.50
Paesi europei. Questo era principalmente dai metodi che discusso in un precedente intervista.
08.57
Va bene. Per colmare tale divario e tornare a una situazione in cui il commercio è in qualche modo hai
09.03
più equilibrata tra quei paesi. Quindi prima si stimolare la domanda così che c’è di più
09.09
domanda all’interno di ciascun paese.
09.12
Ma allora avete bisogno di fare qualcosa di tale che avete uno stimolo della domanda in Italia e il
09.17
risultato di esso non è, diciamo, per metà lo stimolo della domanda andare all’importazione di prodotti
09.24
dalla Germania. E penso che ciò che deve accadere c’è ci devono essere..–per i paesi
09.32
con disavanzi commerciali con la Germania non ci devono essere temporanea esportazione sovvenzioni, così come
09.41
Germania aveva sovvenzioni all’esportazione. Quindi, se si combina un aumento generale di stimolo fiscale [incompr.]
09.47
della domanda e qualcosa per restringere i differenziali di costo, si avrebbe il recupero. Ma
09.54
non sta per accadere. Che non accadra ‘.
09.56
JAY: Ma l’altra parte di questo, troppo, anche non ci deve essere qualcosa perché
10.00
è parte di questa distruzione della domanda interna, si sa, l’abbassamento delle pensioni, e
10.06
soprattutto l’abbassamento e minando dei salari, che se questo sta per essere sostenibile,
10.11
ci deve essere qualche tipo di politiche che portano verso salari più alti? È che non parte
10.15
di questo?
10.16
SETTIMANE: Un numero di persone, gli economisti tedeschi troppo, hanno detto che abbiamo bisogno di una politica in cui crescita
10.24
è legata all’aumento dei salari. E gli aumenti salari reali sono legati per aumentare
10.33
in produttività. Questo era in realtà la pratica nel 1950 e il 1960. Voglio dire, che
10.40
quello che i governi europei hanno cercato di realizzare attraverso vari meccanismi, patti tra – tripartito
10.48
patti con il governo, lavoro e affari, in cui tu..–la rivolta – i redditi dei lavoratori
10.57
e una maggioranza della popolazione si trasferì nel passaggio con produttività e crescita. Abbiamo
11.03
bisogno di tornare a qualcosa di simile. Non vedo che succede, ma che è l’unico modo
11.08
ci sarà una crescita sostenuta ad almeno un ritmo moderato nelle principali economie e,
11.17
implicitamente, a livello globale.
11.20
JAY: Ora, due volte che hai detto, non vedo che succede. Così che cosa vedete accadendo?
11.24
SETTIMANE: Beh, quando lei mi ha intervistato (non so se ti ricordi di esso) nel mese di ottobre dello scorso
11.32
anno, ho detto che non c’era intenzione..–molto probabile che sia un’altra grande crisi finanziaria, e
11.42
probabilmente sarebbe il prossimo anno, cioè nel 2012, e che è tutto il
11.51
euro. Non devi essere Nostradamus per fare quella previsione, permettetemi di dire.
11.57
[incompr.] che cosa accadrà? Le persone sostengono, Beh, sai, dovrebbe Grecia abbandonano? Dovrebbe
12.03
Default Grecia? Che cosa sarà..–sai, con il..–non sarebbe arrabbiato di default? Cose
12.11
sono fuori controllo. Grecia sta per impostazione predefinita. Questo è..–se posso prendere una frase da Gabriel
12.19
García Márquez, questa è una cronaca di un’uscita annunciata. Qualche volta il mese prossimo, Grecia
12.29
predefinito. Ci sarà un’elezione. Se la sinistra è eletto, allora avrai una controllata
12.37
predefinito. In una certa misura esso sarà controllato. Almeno ci sarà un tentativo di gestire
12.44
esso. Se i leader di altri paesi europei sono riusciti nella popolazione greca spaventoso
12.54
in reelecting il clown stesso e ladri che Grecia in questa austerità pasticcio,
13.01
poi anche ci sarà default e uscire, ma sarà caotica, perché ciò che sta accadendo – come
13.09
che hai detto, ciò che sta accadendo in Grecia è il risultato di austerità. Impedisce di austerità
13.18
il governo di avere entrate al servizio del debito. Senza crescita, c’è
13.25
non concepibile esito diverso da quello predefinito.
13.30
JAY: E poi che cosa?
13.33
SETTIMANE: Beh, penso che [incompr.] capacità di prevedere, ma direi che è concepibile
13.42
Grecia potrebbe default e rimanere nell’euro. E che comporterebbe più della stessa miseria,
13.50
solo peggio. Più probabile, penso, è che sarà di default e abbandonate. Credo
14.00
che in Germania e nella Commissione europea, i leader sono già progettando per la Grecia a
14.09
uscita. Penso che prendono la posizione che, si sa, i greci sono stati un problema per
14.15
troppo a lungo, non possono risolvere il problema in termini di Germania, quindi se predefinito, quindi
14.25
solo spingerli.
14.28
Quindi cosa succede all’euro? Molti dicono che si romperà in su. Direi che dipende dalla
14.36
su cosa fanno gli altri paesi deboli, perche ‘, vedi, Germania è una delle economie più forti
14.41
nel mondo, così è inconcepibile che si può avere un crollo di una moneta che è
14.47
utilizzato da uno dei paesi più forti del mondo e un paese che sta crescendo – non
14.52
molto veloce e sulla base di politiche di beggar-thy-neighbor, ma ancora sta crescendo. Quindi non so
14.58
pensare che entrerà in un periodo di instabilità finanziaria molto estreme. Banche andare busto,
15.05
particolarmente in Spagna. Forse alcuni degli spettatori sono state leggendo o vedendo report
15.10
circa le banche in Spagna. È quasi certo che avranno bisogno di essere salvato nuovamente.
15.17
Quindi cosa succederà? I tedeschi dirà, Beh, che Spagna è diventata troppo di un problema
15.23
troppo? Sarà una situazione molto caotica. Come caotico e come sarà risolto io
15.30
Non sapere. Realmente saremo in, sai, un territorio inesplorato, se posso usare un cliché.
15.36
JAY: Grazie per unirsi a noi, John.
15.38
SETTIMANE: Beh, grazie per avermi.
15.40
JAY: E grazie per unirsi a noi su The Real News Network.
Questa voce è stata pubblicata in Economia, FILOSOFIA, Massmediologia, POLITICA. Contrassegna il permalink.

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Connessione a %s...